However, mounted charges were also made in the classic fashion, particularly The infantry assault, consisting of nine brigades of soldiers in a line that stretched for over a mile, resulted in casualties of over 50 percent for the Confederates and a huge psychological blow to Southern morale. Two of the divisions in Pickett's Charge were reduced to Major General George Picketts division, 4,500 men strong, had arrived late in the afternoon on July 2. placed in the forward lines, protected by supporting infantry regiments posted on their flanks or in their rear. Losses were among the war’s heaviest: of about 94,000 Northern troops, casualties numbered about 23,000 (with more than 3,100 killed); of more than 71,000 Southerners, there were about 28,000 casualties (with some 3,900 killed). By day's end, Pickett's casualties, including killed, wounded, and captured, numbered 2,655, or about 42 percent of his men. Just as significantly, the Southern field grade officers suffered high casualties, and their absence would be felt for the duration of the war. Army of the Potomac failed, and on July 4 he began to retreat toward the Potomac. As a prisoner, James Kinsella, a recipient of George Pickett’s gallant action after such defeat, was marched under guard by Pickett’s men to a point in the Shenandoah Valley where the prisoners boarded trains to …